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Highlees Primary School

Highlees
Primary School

Bringing out the Best

Pupil Premium

 

HIGHLEES PRIMARY SCHOOL

PUPIL PREMIUM GRANT

 

The Pupil Premium Grant is additional funding given to schools and academies to:

  • raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils and close the gap between them and their peers.

  • support children and young people with parents in the regular armed forces.

  • It was first introduced in April 2011. Since then the amount schools and academies receive has increased. Schools and academies will receive funding based on the number of pupils who have been eligible for free school meals at any point in the last 6 years (Ever6).

 

FUNDING ALLOCATION FOR 2018-2019 (this has not changed)

  • £1,320 for each eligible primary aged pupil

  • £1,900 for each Looked After Child

  • £300 for each Service Child

The Department for Education has clear expectations how the Pupil Premium Grant may be spent;

  • for the purposes of the school ie; for the educational benefit of pupils registered at that school

  • for the benefit of pupils registered at other maintained schools or academies

  • on community facilities eg; services whose provision furthers any charitable purpose for the benefit of pupils at the school or their families, or people who live or work in the locality in which the school is situated

The grant does not have to be completely spent by schools in the financial year beginning 1 April 2019; some or all of it may be carried forward to future financial years.

 

KEY PRINCIPLES FOR USING THE PUPIL PREMIUM GRANT AT HIGHLEES PRIMARY SCHOOL:

1.      Highlees has an academy wide commitment to raise achievement for pupils who are eligible

         for Pupil Premium and knows these pupils must make faster progress than non-eligible pupils  

         and is determined to achieve this.

2.      Highlees never confuses eligible pupils with low ability and strives to ‘bring out the best’ in

         this group of pupils and support them to achieve the highest levels.

3.      Highlees creates an overall package of support aimed to tackle the range of barriers

         including; attendance, behaviour, external factors, professional development focussing on

         improving outcomes for eligible pupils, improving the quality of teaching and learning,

         language acquisition, parental engagement, opportunities for first hand experiences and

         development of literacy and numeracy skills.

4.      Highlees uses assessment systems to track and enable thorough analysis of data (Reading,

         Writing and Maths) to identify pupils who are underachieving and why.

5.      Highlees directs resources and interventions to accelerate progress of eligible pupils in order

         to strive to diminish the difference in the gap in attainment with non-eligible pupils.

6.      Highlees uses data to carefully track the impact of targeted spending (interventions,

        projects or pedagogy) on attainment and progress of eligible pupils.

7.      Senior Leaders have a clear overview of how funding is allocated and the difference it is

        making to the outcomes of pupils termly.

8.      Highlees ensures class teachers, phase leaders and subject leaders know which pupils are

         eligible for Pupil Premium so they can take responsibility for accelerating progress and

         accountability is shared across the academy.

9.      The Local Governing Body is ambitious for pupils and closely monitors the academy’s

        effectiveness in closing the gap between different groups of pupils.

Highlees is a diverse primary school with  39.6% of pupils being eligible for the Pupil Premium Funding. 13% of our eligible pupils have a Special Educational Need. 53% have English as an additional language.

The school has identified the following barriers:

  

We believe a  multi-faceted approach offers the best opportunity for eligible pupils to succeed and the gap between eligible and non-eligible pupils closes. We believe the key to narrowing the gap between the highest and lowest achieving pupils is thorough QFT. The school regularly monitors the impact of actions and interventions through observations, pupil interviews, work scrutiny as well as tracking of pupil attainment and progress.

 

SCHOOL PROFILE FOR ELIGIBLE PUPILS - May 2019

Year Group

Cohort Total

Pupil Premium Total

Percentage

Reception

48

13

27%

Year 1

55

22

40%

Year 2

59

22

37%

Year 3

58

17

29%

Year 4

59

26

44%

Year 5

59

27

46%

Year 6

57

30

53%

 

395

157

39.7%

 

Performance Data

SUMMARY OF EYFS PERFORMANCE IN 2016 – 2018 (UNVALIDATED DATA)

 

END OF EYFS

Percentage of pupils achieving GLD

 

2016

2017

2018

Eligible for PP

39%

53%

50%

National Non Eligible

72%

73%

73%

 

SUMMARY OF END OF KS1 PERFORMANCE IN 2016 – 2018 (UNVALIDATED DATA)

END OF KS1 STATUTORY ASSESSMENT 2016 - 2018

Percentage of pupils achieving the expected standard+

 

READING

WRITING

MATHS

2016

2017

2018

2016

2017

2018

2016

2017

2018

Eligible for PP

44%

71%

50%

20%

63%

38%

24%

58%

56%

National Non Eligible

78%

79%

79%

70%

72%

74%

77%

79%

80%

Higher strd

Eligible for PP

0%

0%

6%

4%

0%

6%

0%

0%

6%

Higher strd

National Non Eligible

xx

28%

29%

xx

18%

18%

xx

23%

25%

 

SUMMARY OF END OF KS2 PERFORMANCE IN 2016 – 2018 (UNVALIDATED DATA)

END OF KS2 STATUTORY ASSESSMENT 2016 - 2018

Percentage of pupils achieving the expected standard+

 

READING

WRITING

MATHS

EGPS

RWM

2016

2017

2018

2016

2017

2018

2016

2017

2018

2016

2017

2018

2016

2017

2018

Eligible for PP

37%

41%

46%

67%

41%

61%

59%

53%

46%

44%

44%

46%

30%

29%

36%

National Non Eligible

71%

77%

80%

79%

81%

83%

75%

80%

81%

78%

82%

82%

60%

67%

70%

Higher strd

Eligible for PP

4%

6%

4%

0%

0%

0%

0%

3%

4%

0%

3%

11%

0%

0%

0%

Higher strd

National Non Eligible

23%

29%

33%

18%

21%

24%

20%

27%

28%

27%

35%

39%

7%

11%

12%

 

PHONICS SCREENING

Phonics percentages attaining the expected standard Years 1 and 2 trend

Y1

2015

2016

2017

2018

 

school

national

school

national

school

national

school

national

all

47

77

63

81

59

81

79

83

boys

47

73

50

77

61

78

78

79

girls

48

81

78

84

58

85

77

86

Ever 6

36

66

56

70

65

84

77

85

LAC

             

83

 

Y2

2017

2018

 

School (21 children)

School (25 children)

all

48

68

boys

43

59

girls

57

88

Ever 6

45

80

LAC

   
 

ATTENDANCE DATA 2017 - 2018

 
 

Attendance

Unauthorised

Persistent Absence

 

2016-2017

2017-2018

2016-2017

2017-2018

2016-2017

2017-2018

Eligible for PPG

95.2%

94.6%

0.94%

1.32%

10%

13%

National FSM (Aut’16-Spr’17) SFR 55/2017

93%

93%

   

21.6%

21.3%

Not Eligible

95.6%

96%

0.81%

0.83%

8.54%

8.37%

National FSM (Aut’16-Spr’17) SFR 55/2017

95.9%

96%%

 

1.1%

8.1%

8.3%

 

Results from 2018 Statutory Assessment at the end of Key Stage 2 (unvalidated data) shows a marginal improvement in the percentage of eligible pupils achieving the expected standard in Reading, Writing and Maths combined from 29% in 2017 to 35% in 2018 . Despite the improvement, standards remain well below National comparators.  There has been:

  • +5% improvement in Reading (41% to 46%)

  • + 20% improvement in Writing (41% to 61%)

  • -7% decline in Mathematics (53% to 46%)

 

The picture at the end of KS1 shows a decline in standards and is well below National comparators. . There is a four year upward trend in % of eligible pupils achieving the expected standard in Phonics (36% in 2015 to 77% in 2018) Phonics data at the end of Year 1 shows a significant improvement in 2018 (20% for disadvantaged) and the difference is diminishing (8% gap in 2018). The percentage of Y2 children achieving the expected standard in the Y2 retakes has also improved by 35% from 2017 - 2018.

 

Despite extensive work to promote and improve attendance, the attendance data of eligible pupils has slipped during 2017-2018. However, the attendance is better than National by 1.6% and persistent absence is 8.3% better than National data for the same group. Also Nationally, persistent absence of pupils eligible for FSM was more than twice the rate for pupils not eligible for FSM (21.3 per cent and 8.3 percent respectively). This pattern is not mirrored in school - a 4.7% gap.